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Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts


*Please DONATE to my blog! Any amount will be appreciated! Either click the donate button on the side panel of the blog or send them via paypal to my email svfreebird87@gmail.com. Thank you!

*Dreamworks (I just saw their film, Rio 2, by the way and I did enjoy it. I also saw the preview short for this upcoming movie) is producing a movie, Home, that will feature a black female character, Tip, in the lead and she will be voiced by Rihanna. So, I will definitely be seeing this and I guess it is safe to say the character is Afro-Caribbean! Yay! Here is the synopsis:

“When Earth is taken over by the overly-confident Boov, an alien race in search of a new place to call home, all humans are promptly relocated, while the Boov get busy efficiently reorganizing the planet. But when one resourceful girl, Tip, (Rihanna) manages to avoid capture, she finds herself the accidental accomplice of a banished Boov by the name of Oh (Jim Parsons). Equally stubborn and set in their ways, these two fugitives realize there’s a lot more at stake than intergalactic relations as they embark on the road trip of a lifetime. Good thing they have a flying car.”

*Tonight Black Girl Nerds featured The Afrofuturist Affair‘s Rasheedah Phillips on their podcast.

*Kiplyn Primus and The Local Take on WCLK deidcated their program to The Octavia Butler Celebration of Fantastic Arts Symposium on Art and Activism event on April 16th. Tananarive Due, Adrienne Maree Brown and Dream Hampton join the “discussion about Afro Futurism, science fiction and fantasy, and the role of African Americans in fiction and in art.” Here is the broadcast. Also, you can watch some videos from the event here.

*Daniel Jose Older’s post, “Diversity Is Not Enough: Race, Power, Publishing:” ““The publishing industry looks a lot like these best-selling teenage dystopias: white and full of people destroying each other to survive.”

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Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts


*Please DONATE to my blog! Any amount would be appreciated. Either click on the donate button on the side panel or send donations via PAYPAL to my email svfreebird87@gmail.com. Thank you!

Jamea Richmond Edwards

*”Dope Art: Jamea Richmond-Edwards Charcoal Drawings” on For Harriet.

*”Daenerys Targaryen is back to “save the coloureds” Tour de #GameofThrones 2014” on Media Diversified: “The character of Daenerys Targaryen is emblematic of Game of Thrones continuous problem with race[1]. Beyond the emetic “white saviour scene to close Season 3, we are first introduced to her during a forced marriage to Khal Drogo of the Dothraki people (who are non-white). At the wedding, the Dothraki are painted as little more than savages, with the men literally killing each other to force themselves on the women; hypersexual and hyperviolent, two big racist boxes are ticked[2].

This state of affairs remains the norm if you are both a regular television viewer, and a person of colour (PoC). The dynamic is especially acute in the world of genre fiction. Because we all look at the television screen, and what stares back at us is a lens; a white lens. It’s why weak racial depictions remain a habitual problem.

Culture is the progeny of the world we live in, and for far too many writers, the world they live in is so saturated by the social construct of “whiteness”  that they fail to see anything beyond that. Which – intentionally or otherwise – serves to position whiteness as the only point of view worth depicting[3].”

*Indiegogo Campaign for short, 42:24. Here is the summary:

“Back in 2010, I was listening to Erykah Badu’s “Twinkle,” while designing a website. Intrigued about the new language I encountered on the track, I learned that the meaning of the words were directly connected to my studies of Kemetic (Ancient Egypt) Science at the time. I decided to write 42:24, a short film incorporating the 24 hour routine of the 42 Laws of Ma’at.

In 24 hours, Carla Khari is challenged to adhere to the 42 Laws of Ma’at, when her cousin, Brea Taylor comes to stay at her house. Carla just wants to find balance before the sun reemerges.”

*In Buffalo, New York, artist Lauren Ashley Howard is presenting her solo exhibition, Voyager: Navigating the Black Feminine Space on April 26th. Here is the description: “The Black Barbie Corps. of Astronauts (BBCA) invites you to explore the Black Feminine Space through an installation featuring paintings, found objects, performance, photography, and the BBCA’s Space Shuttle Crew–the reverse relaxed Barbie dolls.”

*CCCADI‘s 2nd Annual Health & Wellness Expo, Transforming the Temple: The Bliss of Now will be happening on April 26th. Susan L. Taylor, founder of the National CARES Mentoring Movement and former Editor in Chief of Essence Magazine, will give the keynote address. Click on the link above to get more information and buy tickets.

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Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts


*Please DONATE to the blog! Any amount is appreciated! Either click the donate button at the side panel or send donations via paypal to my email svfreebird87@gmail.com. Thank you!

Source: Creator’s Project

*Janelle Monae Interview on The Guardian (David Bowie and Iman are huge fans!) and post about the future of holograms in concerts featuring Monae and M.I.A.’s performance.

*”7 Black Scientists and Engineers Who Helped Make Space Travel Possible” on Atlanta Black Star.

*Oju Africa has developed their own black emojis.

*Black Radical Imagination is presenting a 2-day forum from April 11-12th screening various films at NYC’s Cooper Union, featuring films and works from Martine Syms, Jeannette Elhers, Jabari Zuberi, Terence Nance & Sanford Biggers, Lauren Kelley, Lewis Vaughn and a special screening of Memory Room 452 by John Akomfrah.

*Besides appearing at MOONDANCE at PS1 next week, King Britt will also be opening the exhibition, Omnipresent, for the reboot of the science fiction magazine, Omni Magazine. on April 11th at Red Bull Studios in NYC.

*”Cool Jobs: Comic Illustrator Talks Art and Race in the World of Superheroes-” Afua Richardson Interview on Black Enterprise: “From what I’ve seen, there are some amazing black male artists in the industry – there’s Brian Stelfreeze, Nelson Blake, Sanford green, Keron Grant—they’re there. What I think ends up happening is a lot of aspiring black creators often make these kind of cliché comics. They make comics about the hood or about Egypt and they don’t push the perimeters of what being black can be defined as. Perhaps they think that because there’s not a lot of black protagonists, people should support them ,regardless of the quality of their work. They’re almost like, “Well, we’re not accepted, we’re not represented in comics properly so just accept this current effort.”  The problem I have with that, is they’re expecting Marvel and DC to tell their story instead of telling it themselves . being black is not a handicap. You can’t expect someone else to tell your story and get it correctly. I would hope they’d aspire to be a universal creator. Put your culture in your work, but also tell a good story. Make it, so that anyone can receive this and understand. If you create something for a niche market, understand the limitations of that niche. Beyond popular belief, Black people are not a niche market. The concepts, the stories, the things that blacks as a whole have contributed to humanity go beyond hip-hop and the streets.”

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Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts


*Please DONATE to the blog! Any amount is appreciated! Either click on the donate button on the side or send donations to paypal via my email svfreebird87@gmail.com. Thank you!

Ras G and The Afrikan Space Program

*”Don’t Blame Science Fiction for Hollywood’s Race Problem:” “And there’s a decent amount of it these days, because the post-millennial resurgence in Afrofuturism has been one of the more fascinating and welcome developments of the last decade or so. This trend been written about a fair amount in relation to music — the most prominent example is Janelle Monáe and her ArchAndroid mythos, but there’s also the hyperspace hip hop of Flying Lotus and Deltron 3030 and the more esoteric work of acts like Ras G and the Afrikan Space Program, whose most recent album, Back On the Planet, was one of the under-appreciated joys of last year.

You hear less about an Afrofuturist revival in film and literature, but if there’s not been a resurgence in other areas of pop culture, it might be because, hey, Afrofuturism never really went away. Octavia Butler was writing right up until her death in 2006, and produced as rich a body of work as any of her white male contemporaries. And once you start digging, there’s a wealth of writing that addresses the future from the perspective of people of color, from the reasonably well-known to the fascinatingly obscure.”

*”Star Wars and the 4 Ways Science Fiction Handles Race:” How science fiction uses metaphor, tokenism, diversity and explicit dealing with racial issues to handle race.

 

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Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts


*Please DONATE to my blog by clicking on the donate button at the side panel or send funds to my email svfreebird87@gmail.com. Any amount is appreciated! Thank you!

*Feature about Dr. Sheena C. Howard on Black Girl Nerds: “Dr. Howard is author of the book Black Queer Identity Matrix (2014) and first author of the book, Black Comics: Politics of Representation. She has featured as a guest speaker at various workshops, universities and high schools including, but not limited to: Penn State University, West Chester University and West Catholic High School, due to her work around intercultural communication, diversity, service to the community and leadership.

Black Comics: Politics of Race and Representation by Sheena C. Howard and Ronald L. Jackson originated from Howard’s graduate school dissertation on Aaron McGruder’s The Boondocks comic strip. Howard’s dissertation examined gender dynamics, African American Vernacular English and Black hegemonic masculinity within the language and aesthetic of the comic strip. While writing her dissertation Dr. Howard was alarmed at the lack of books which featured or even mentioned the names of Black cartoonists. From there, Howard decided to create a baseline of literature around the historical and present-day contributions of Black cartoonists.

* Yes, Comics Can Empower Black Girlson Zetta Elliot’s Blog: “The twenty titles discussed below are just a start, especially now that the comic book publishers are paying more attention to girls and young adult women as marketing demographics. And while not all the comics I cite are created by black women, events like the recent panel on “Black Women in Comics” at the Schomburg Center’s 2nd Annual Black Comic Book Day make clear that black women have long been a part of the industry as avid consumers and creators. The dynamic work of Afua Richardson and C. Spike Trotman, along with this list of over 50 black women comics artists and writers from the Jackie Ormes Society models the kind of creative freedom that can empower any girl who picks up a comic.”

*Ytasha L. Womack’s “RAYLA 2212, the complete galactic love saga of Rayla Illmatic debuts at the Chicago Comic Con, April 25-27.

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Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts


*Please DONATE to my blog! Any amount is appreciated! You can click the paypal button at the side panel or send it to my email svfreebird87@gmail.com through paypal. I was not able to do this post last week because my computer malfunctioned, so this is a combined post for the past two weeks.

*If you haven’t seen it already, the trailer for Oya: Rise of the Orisha premiered this week!
It looks like the film will be epic! Inspired by the Yoruba religion of West African and its goddess/warrior-spirit of winds, storms, fertility, magic and guardian of the underworld, Oya, the synopsis of the story follows Ade “one of the few people with a connection to one of the gods, Oya. She has been tasked with the job of protecting the innocent and that means keeping the door to the gods shut. If the doorway to the gods is opened, they will wreak chaos upon us as retribution for our abandonment of them. To keep the door shut, she must find ‘the key,’ a young girl with the potential to open the doorway, and keep her safe.

The adventure unfolds with a host of memorable characters and a string of unexpected twists, Ade, goes in search of the key, battling against those who wish to open portal and unleashing a horde of forgotten gods and goddesses into the world, with powers and skills beyond our comprehensive and supernatural gifts which will change the course of history for mankind, forever.”

Take a look at Black Girls Code Episode 2:

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Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts


Steven Klein’s “Warrior Stance”

*Please DONATE at the side panel!

*Submissions guidelines at top of page.

Speculative Fictions By Women Writers I’m going to Read This Year” on Ladies Finger including works from NK Jeminson, Nnedi Okorafor and Karen Lord.

*”Whitewashing reproductive rights: How black activists get erased” on Salon: “Many in the black community have fought for reproductive justice — but we’re often left out of the story”

*”15 Black Women Visual Artists You Should Know” and “Carrie Mae Weems and Mickalene Thomas Discuss Challenging Boundaries Through Visual Art” on For Harriet.

*Omega Sirius Moon Interview on Slash ‘Em Up.

*”Astroblackness Conference Co Creator, Adilifu Nama Speaks” on iAfrofuturism.

*“Tunde Olaniran on Otherness, Archetypes, and Activism” Interview on AudioFemme and his Flint: A Sci-fi Love Story feature on MLive..

*”Black Kirby Now: Interview with John Jennings

*”Steven Klein’s Surrealist City Aliens” on Okay Africa featuring Sudanese Model Ajak Deng.

*”The Incoherent Backlashes to Black Actors Playing ‘White’ Superheroes” on The Atlantic: “Comics have a history of altering characters’ races and ethnicities, but outcry over Michael B. Jordan’s next role illustrates that, in American racism, only certain differences matter.”

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Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts


*Please DONATE to my blog at the side of my blog to fund trademarking and future merchandising, and to continue my ability to attend future events. Doing this costs money!!! Anything helps!!! Thank you!!!!

*New Submission Guidelines on Contact and Submissions Page.

Update: *Unnamed Press announced the NYC launch of PEN Fellow Deji Bryce Olukotun’s book Nigerians in Space. He will be in a conversation with Joel Whitney of Guernica and Al Jazeera at Word Brooklyn on February 26th at 7pm. For more information click here.

Rigamo

*The Clutch’s “Calling All Nerds, Geeks, Afro-Punks and Other Such Off-Beat Black Folks…” list

*Saul Williams and Sanford Biggers will be in conversation at the Studio Museum on Thursday, February 2 at 7pm. They will explore “the sonic, visual and textual in their practices in the context of Afrofuturist aesthetics.” The day after, Columbia University along with the Studio Museum will be presenting John Akomfrah’s film about Stuart Hall, who recently passed away. Buy tickets for the Williams and Biggers talk here.

*Frances Bodomo’s Afronauts will be part of The Film Society at Lincoln Center and MOMA’s New Directors/New Films festival in March. Tickets for general audiences go on sale March 10.

*Che Grayson and Sharon De La Cruz’s Rigamo Film and Comic Book project. The project is about a Kera Moore, “a young girl who accidentally stumbles upon a secret ability: her tears bring people back to life. However, there is one caveat: when she brings someone back to life, she ages by multiple years.”

*Wax Poetics’ “Not Just Knee Deep:  Deep in conversation with Shock G” of Digital Underground talks about his influences, like George Clinton in this interview: Part 1 Part 2 and Part 3.

*Bitch Magazine’s “Black to the Future:” Women in Afrofuturism featuring Janelle Monae, Missy Elliot, THEESatisfaction, Ebony Bones and Martine Syms.

*Shadow and Act’s “Interview: Exploring the Unseen with M. Asli Dukan (Director of ‘Invisible Universe’)

*Fantastic Four Reboot Casting: Is It Progressive?

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Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts


Hasani Claxton

*Please DONATE to blog at the side panel, so I can trademark it and begin the process of merchandising. Any amount appreciated. Thank you!

*Afrofuturism: A Reading List for Black History Month

*Retelling origin stories of Afrofuturism and The New Jim Crow

*“Grace Jones in concert in ‘A One Man Show’:” Earlier this week, I wrote a post, “Dapper Ladies,” including Grace Jones. Well, Dangerous Minds has also written about the development of her masculine alter ego.

*Hasani Claxton‘s fantasy art featured on Afropunk: “Hasani captures the essence of ancient people of the African diaspora combining ethnic patterns, texture, satire, and scenery along with a recognizable love for nature. With a hint of an African-Medieval feel, Hasani brings to life pre-colonial African history through mythology, portraying Afro people as the beautiful, heroic, and royals that we are. In hopes of one day illustrating artwork for young children, Hasani Claxton continues to create art that conveys the people of the African diaspora as positive forces within the world, contrary to the image society paints us to be.”

*Adrienne Maree Brown’s “science fiction and social justice beginner reading list”

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Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts


“Afronauts” by Daniel Kojo Schrade at Goethe Institut Afrofuturism exhibition

*I am planning to a fundraiser in the future to raise money for trademarking my blog name and logo as well as to do merchandising. But in the meantime, please donate at the sidebar. Any amount is appreciated. Thank you!

Check out Chinaka Hodge’s “Black Future Month” posts.

*Raimi Gbadamosi‘s “Afrofuturism as a New Consciousness”

*Seattle’s EMP Museum’s “Fantastic Voyage: Black Presence in Sci-Fi, Fantasy, and Technology” on February 16. The films featured will be Eyes on the Stars, Black Girls Code, Is That Me?, Odessa, Space Out and Kirikou and the Sorceress.

*”Afrofuturism: Artists on Three Continents Explore ‘Black to the Future’” will be on exhibition the whole month of February at Goethe Institut in Washington.

*Fundraiser for post-production of M. Asli Dukan’s Invisible Universe:

*Fundraiser for THEESatisfaction’s Black Weirdo Party Tour:

*Tananarive Due and Steven Barnes’ short film Danger Word will be showing at the Pan-African film festival on February 13th, 16th and 17th.

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