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Tag Archives: Afrosurrealism

Art of This World: Sol’Sax + Maksaens Denis + Kara Walker


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Despite having a cold last week and recovering from it, which is why I have not posted in a week, I managed to go to three exhibitions — Sol’Sax’s Medicine from Heaven: How African American Culture Was Used to Cure the USA, Maksaens Denis’ Mutation X062 and Kara Walker’s A Subtlety. Below are slideshows from each event:

Sol’Sax‘s Medicine from Heaven: How African American Culture Was Used to Cure the USA at Skylight Gallery in Brooklyn

This exhibition reminded me a lot of Margaret Vendryes’ African Diva Project where traditional African masks are placed on the faces of legendary African-American figures symbolizing the sacredness of African-American and African Diasporic cultures.

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The My-Stery: The “Label” of (Afro)futurism


I have not done this post in a while, so here it goes:

Recently, Shadow and Act reposted an essay from last year, “African Renaissance, How The Prefix ‘Afro-’ May Arrest Imagination & Manifesto Salesmanship,” by Phetogo Tshepo Mahasha. I had a few thoughts about it that I formed during a private conversation with Cosmic Yoruba last year, but I never published them. So, I decided to do it now, especially after seeing Pumzi director Wanuri Kahiu’s TED Talk about labels:

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Posted by on June 11, 2014 in Afrofuturism/Afrosurrealism, The My-Stery

 

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Modern Griots Reviews: Afrofuturism – The World of Black Sci-FI and Fantasy Culture


I know I am a bit late on reviewing this one, but finally here is my review of it:

Ytasha L. Womack’s Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-fi and Fantasy Culture is a well-thought out introductory book that is a smooth blend between a personal memoir and a reference source for those interested in delving into the world of afrofuturism. Each chapter expands on the last and expands conventional ideas of what afrofuturism is, giving space to many voices within it and giving plenty space for further research into the aesthetic and lens.

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Otherworldly Videos: A Lot of New….


Tawiah – “TEARdrop”

Zebra Katz – “Y I Do”

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Moving on the Wires: Black Science Fiction Festival, Alien Bodies, Blitz the Ambassador and The Last Poets, NYU Black Surrealism Conference…


*Black Science Fiction Film Festival on February 7th in Atlanta, Georgia. Watch clip below:

*The Alien Bodies: Race, Space and Sex in the African Diaspora Conference will be taking place at Emory University on February 8-9 in Atlanta Georgia. Sadly, I won’t be there, but at least it will be recorded for later viewing. Also, after the conference, there will be a Music from the Mothership: Sonic Event at Emory Dobbs University Center.

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Art of This World: Ramel Jasir


Gestation exhibition

Ramel Jasir began his painting career in 2006 after a friend advised him to start as a way to deal with some stressful events in his life. As a self-taught artist, he describes (click on the link to see his interview) his art as his “ever-evolving voice in color.” Taking influences from indigenous art found in cultures all over the world, he creates a variety of artwork including realist, abstract, collage and even cartoonish.

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Posted by on October 16, 2012 in Art, Art of This World

 

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Art of This World: Adelaide Damoah


Adelaide Damoah began her artwork as a way to help her with her battle with endometriosis. Basing her work on surrealist principles and artists like Frida Kahlo, Damoah expresses her feelings about herself and the world around her through her art. “When I paint, I feel free, I feel transported into another dimension where time does not matter,” Damoah said in her biography. In her haunting and fantastical pieces, Damoah alters or distorts bodily features, whether it is changing the skin color of a subject, emphasizing the gaunt figures of some of today’s models or creating alien-like figures with one eye. In addition to her own artwork, Damoah also interviews other artists in her Art Success series.

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The AfroFuturist / AfroSurrealist Connection: The Visionary As Spectacle


BK Adams – I Am Art

“Without deviation from the norm, progress is not possible.” – Frank Zappa

Since my blog does cover the African diaspora through both Afrofuturist and Afrosurrealist lens, I wanted to bring Afrosurrealism more into the picture. Afrosurrealism does not have as much articles on it as Afrofuturism does, but I want to show the connections between the two based on the Afrosurrealism Manifesto.

One afrofuturist I follow is afrovisionary (I know, so much afro!) and the name had me thinking about what is a visionary. Then I thought about the word itself with its root word, “vision” and its definition. The word visionary has both futuristic and surreal elements in it. A visionary is one who has “unusual foresight and imagination.” Visionaries envision or speculate about not only possible futures, but also envision invisible worlds, dream worlds, and the supernatural or paranormal. They can see beyond worlds that already exist or are visible.

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Posted by on September 10, 2012 in Afrofuturism/Afrosurrealism

 

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Art of This World: Jaszmine Asha Hawkins


Jaszmine Asha Hawkins is a New Jersey-based visual artist whose artwork is vibrantly and beautifully unusual with her “big-lipped” and “alien-looking” figures. Currently she is looking for galleries who will showcase her work. For more information about her and to contact Hawkins, visit on her facebook or twitter page.

 
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Posted by on August 31, 2012 in Art, Art of This World

 

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Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth: Claude McKay


Below is a 1926 poem by Jamaican-American poet Claude McKay, called “My Home.” It contains, I believe, some of the elements from both afrofuturism and afrosurrealism:

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