Tag Archives: Black time

The M(N)STRY: Activating the Archive Through Poetics


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With everything happening in the news that frightens me about the future of this country and world, I turn back again to the importance of the archive, storytelling and truth-telling for marginalized communities. Last month, I went to archivist and writer Joyce LeeAnn and researcher and writer Akeema-Zane’s workshop In the Middle of Things: The Poetics of Archival Praxis, which was part of Pioneer Works’ series Fact Craft.

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Moving on the Wires: Recent News and Posts


*Become a patron and support my blog and other writing endeavors on Patreon!

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This post has been missing for the past couple of weeks, so here is a combined one:

Rasheedah Phillips’ “Black Quantum Futurism” theory

*Should Science Fiction and Fantasy be Included in the “New Wave of African Writers”? on Books Live: Since Science Fiction and Fantasy are still considered genre fiction and not high literary fiction, I can see why this happened. Still not right though.

*”So I Geek Yeeah: Six Black Women Geeks You Should Know” on For Harriet.

*”Afrofuturism through the eyes of Bill Campbell” Interview on Oak Park: “Oddly enough, I’m one of those artists who’s not really into definitions. However, I think of Afrofuturism as an artistic movement spanning the different disciplines where the Diaspora gets to examine its own past and future, its own humanity within the context of speculative fiction. It is global and quite disparate and, to me, incredibly hard to pin down in just a few words. I think that’s why I like it so much. There are so many possibilities within Afrofuturism — and within all of us.”

MLK, science fiction, innovation, creative thinking and Afrofuturism” Interview with Ytasha Womack on Chicago Tribune: “[Afrofuturism is looking at alternate realities through a black cultural lens. It’s expressed in so any different mediums, but it brings in science, math and philosophy. It provides a window to look at all these different ideas.”

*Submissions call for next issue of Joint Literary Magazine: “Capitalist Realities and Their Consequences.

We are looking for work that responds to the question, “How do capitalist conceptions of time expand or limit how we perceive reality and negotiate our identities as persons within the African diaspora?” Consider capitalist notions about time and space, the commodification of body and/or intellectual resources, etc.”

Continue reading Moving on the Wires: Recent News and Posts