Category Archives: Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth

Basic.Instructions.Before.Leaving.Earth: Caribbean Comics


Beaming in from Barbados –Back with the Astro-Caribbean series…

The United States has a large comics book industry. But that doesn’t mean other places are not developing their own. As my parents are from Barbados and Dominica, I wanted to feature two comic book creators and publishers making it happen in the Caribbean:

Beyond Publishing Caribbean

Matthew Clarke

“Beyond Publishing is a group of young and talented Barbadian artists and writers who are seeking to encourage reading and creativity by capturing the imagination of young people and the young at heart.

Beyond Publishing tries to showcase stories with a Barbadian or Caribbean flavour, through several genres: comedy, adventure, educational or drama.”

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Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth: Elizabeth Nunez ‘s Books of Caribbean Magic


Next week, Elizabeth Nunez will be read from her memoir, Not for Everyday Use, at the fifth annual ringShout event, which will be the Brooklyn Book Festival Bookend event. The event will take place September 16 at 7pm at the Franklin Park Bar and Beer Garden in Brooklyn, and also features Bridgett M. Davis (Into the Go-Slow), Saeed Jones (Prelude to Bruise), and Lauren Francis-Sharma (‘Til the Well Runs Dry). By coincidence, i randomly picked up two of Nunez’s works at the library a couple of months ago, Beyond the Limbo Silence, and When the Rocks Dance, and they were great introductions to her mythic and magic-filled writing. As I continue to look for Caribbean works that can be analyzed from an afrofuturist lens, I was fortunate to stumble across her work.

Born in Trinidad, Nunez combines Trinidadian and Caribbean culture with magic realist, mytho-spiritual and mystical elements. The first work of hers I read was Beyond the Limbo Silence, an alternate historical fiction set in 1960s Trinidad and America during the Civil Rights Era that infuses water myths, dreams, Voudou ritual and Obeah magic. The story follows Sara Edgehill, a young woman who feels like an outcast in her native land of Trinidad, Continue reading Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth: Elizabeth Nunez ‘s Books of Caribbean Magic

Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth: Amanda Johnston


Amanda Johnston Pic
Source: Prose and Cons Editing

Women Writers in Bloom is a literary salon I started attending a couple of months ago and this month’s featured Texan poet Amanda Johnston. Today I feature her here with some of her poetry influenced by science fiction/fantasy films, like Blade and The Matrix.

Below are two poems, “Mixed Blood” and “Blade Speaks at Career Day,” published in Kinfolks Journal based on the Blade movies:

(click on the image to see full screen)

Amanda Johnston

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Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth: Danez Smith


“I have left Earth in search of darker planets…I have left Earth and I won’t stop until I’ve found a place where my kin can be safe…”

I saw Danez Smith‘s “Dear White America” posted on Upworthy and thought it was fitting for here.

Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth: “The Guide and The Guided”


photo1-5Update:

I took a picture of this poem while I was visiting a cousin of mine and I thought it was fitting for the theme of my blog and afrofuturism that is emphasized with the the images of Saturn and stars in the background, the procession of black people with flames over their heads, and the object behind them that looks like either a rocket ship or a monument. The work is a collaboration between poet Daniel Marks and artist Bobby Moore.

You can see this and other photos I take on my instagram.

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Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth: Caribbean Futurisms


Thank you Kelly Baker Josephs for calling my attention to this!

id a post describing “Caribbean Futurisms” and listing a few books that would fall under the term as well as other sources for Afrofuturism, in which I was included:

“Considered within this conditional crux, Caribbean cultural forms have developed a conscious capacity to play with time and space, especially within the last century. For example, a Caribbean novel can leap “forward,” as well as “backward,” as well as speculatively vault “across” times, because its people have been integral to the creation of how human activity is narratively measured. As well, a Caribbean novel can traverse lands from around this world and others because its people, their ancestors, and new generations travel these vast distances.

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Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth: Catherine Acholonu and Molara Ogundipe


Hey everyone! I am back after taking a short needed break. Last week marked the third year that I have been running this blog! Yay! Happy Anniversary!

Today I return to highlight a few writers I found out about after reading Bilphena Yahwon’s post on Africa Is Done Suffering, “The Writers I Never Learned About.” In this post, Yahwon writes about mainstream literary establishments and education systems lack of inclusion of black women writers in their canons. Her pieces is an addition to a growing critique of these institutions, like Junot Diaz’s “MFA vs. POC” and “We Need Diverse Books Campaign.”  Besides listing writers I already knew, she did include ones I did not know as well and wanted to show their work here. The two women and their books I want to feature are Nigerian writers and activists Catherine Acholonu and Molara Ogundipe.

Dr. Acholonu, who passed away in March, was a essayist, playwright, poet and published several books of her own anthropological and scientific research into African cultures, specifically Igbo, and gender studies. Some of her books include “The Gram Code of African Adam: Stone Books and Cave Libraries, Reconstructing 450,000 Years of Africa’s Lost Civilizations, which earned her the award of Professor of African History and Philosophy from Pilgrim’s University and Theological Seminary, North Carolina; The Earth Unchained – A Quantum Leap in Consciousness, A Reply to Al Gore; Motherism – The Afrocentric Alternative to Feminism and The Igbo Roots of Olaudah Equiano”

The Gram Code of African Adam is the first book in her African Adam series and explores the history behind the ancient stone inscriptions of Ikom, Cross River State, Nigeria and contributions of ancient Africans to the world in that they possessed systems of writing. The sequel to the book, They Lived Before Adam, delved into prehistoric origins of the Igbo and that “Igbo oral tradition is consistent with scientific research into the origins of humanity.” She said in a lecture at a Harlem book fair, “Igbo oral traditions confirm the findings of geneticists, that by 208000BC – 208000 BC – human evolution was interrupted and Adam, a hybrid, was created through the process of genetic engineering. However, our findings reveal that the creation of Adam was a downward climb on the evolutionary ladder, because he lost his divine essence, he became divided, no longer whole, or wholesome. All over Africa and in ancient Egyptian reports, oral and written traditions maintain that homo erectus people were heavenly beings, and possessed mystical powers such as telepathy, levitation, bi-location, that their words could move rocks and mountains and change the course of rivers. Adam lost all that when his right brain was shut down by those who made him.”

Her last book and last book of the series, “The Lost Testament of the Ancestors of Adam: Unearthing Heliopolis/Igbo Ukwu – The Celestial City of the Gods of Egypt and India,” theorizes West Africa as a place of origin for other Eastern cultures, like Egyptian culture and hieroglyphs.

Continue reading Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth: Catherine Acholonu and Molara Ogundipe