Tag Archives: fantasy

StoryCraft: A Stitch In Time


a-stitch-in-time-lee-ann-newsom
A Stitch in Time by Lee Ann Newsom

Guess what?

What?

I’m on Wattpad! As I continue writing my fantasy novel, I want to keep practicing my story-writing skills, therefore, I will be posting short fiction on there.

My first is called, “A Stitch In Time,” which follows a teenage girl who meets an unexpected guest who lives in her home and discovers that her mother is about give away a sewing machine with special powers, something this new guest also wants. If you like Anansi stories, you might like this one!

Part 1 and Part 2 are up now!

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Moving on the Wires: News, Posts, New Music


*Get Futuristically Ancient t-shirts for $20 on teespring.

*Subtletea’s “David Herrle reviews NEAR KIN: A COLLECTION OF WORDS AND ART INSPIRED BY OCTAVIA ESTELLE BUTLER:” David Herrie writes an analysis of Butler’s work and her influence on the anthology, Near Kin. By the way, he include me and my poem in the review. Cool!

*Check out this new comic from Opportunity Agenda, Helvetika Bold, about a social justice superhero who fights the status quo with her words and media savvy.

From Afropunk: “Working with artist-activist Dragonfly, we have been able to bring Helvetika to life as a living, breathing maven of moxie…Not only does she fictionally save the world, she leads with values and effective social justice communications messaging that actually demands action and change. The more support that Helvetika can gain, the more likely that her story can continue sooner rather than later, and the more damage she can do to The Status Quo!”

*Afrofuturism 849 is “a Chicago-based organization dedicated to creating artistic and educational events and programs that support the Afrofuturist global community,” featuring Floyd Webb and Ytasha Womack. “We encourage the visioning of a peaceful today and tomorrow that engages the best of diverse perspectives from the ancient to the future.

We celebrate the intersection between black cultures, indigenous cultures, technology, the imagination, liberation and mysticism as we champion innovation around the world. The number 8.49 is the apparent magnitude of Sirius B, a star celebrated by the Dogon. This star inspires people around the world and we recognize it as one of many symbols of innovation, uncovered pasts and created futures.” They are currently accepting submission for a February Black History Month film program. Email them at info@afrofuturism49.com.

Continue reading Moving on the Wires: News, Posts, New Music

Moving on the Wires: News, Posts, New Music


*Wildseeds: The NOLA Octavia Butler Emergent Strategies Collective is presenting Cosmic Belonging: A Conversation on Afrofuturism, Sustainability, and Dreaming Black Into the Future. See more information about it in the picture below.

*John Jennings and Stacey Robinson has released their comic, Kid Code: Channel Zero via Rosarium Publishing. Here is the description of it: “Kid Code: Channel Zero is a rollicking, cosmic, time-traveling adventure, fusing classic hip-hop culture and outlandish sci-fi fantasy in this alternate universe to create the ultimate mash-up.

Everything’s a remix! And Kid Code and his comrades must fight against The Power, who eons ago sampled the first sounds made from the God MC and created the Dark Mix (a version of the universe that was never intended).

Now there’s a race against and for time throughout the universe to assemble The Everlasting Cosmic Mixtape–nine tracks that can re-assemble the God Sample and help set things back on course.

The adventure starts here in Kid Code: Channel Zero.”

*Daily News’ “Run-DMC’s rapper Darryl McDaniels launches new comic book line:” “The newly minted comic company, Darryl Makes Comics, is ready to debut its first novel, ‘DMC’ at New York Comic Con in October. Darryl McDaniels portrays himself as a superhero instead of a rapper in the graphic novels.”

*A Killing in the Sun, a collection of speculative fiction from Africa, was recently released: “It draws from the rich oral culture of the author’s childhood, to tell a wide variety of stories. Some of the stories are set in a futuristic Africa, where technology has transformed everyday life and a dark force rules. Others are set in the present day, with refugee aliens from outer space, ghosts haunting brides and grooms, evil scientists stalking villages, and greedy corporations creating apocalypses. There are murder mysteries, tales of reincarnation and of the walking dead, and alternative worlds whose themes any reader will identify with. This collection is deftly crafted, running along the thin boundary of speculative and literary genres.”

Continue reading Moving on the Wires: News, Posts, New Music

Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth: Elizabeth Nunez ‘s Books of Caribbean Magic


Next week, Elizabeth Nunez will be read from her memoir, Not for Everyday Use, at the fifth annual ringShout event, which will be the Brooklyn Book Festival Bookend event. The event will take place September 16 at 7pm at the Franklin Park Bar and Beer Garden in Brooklyn, and also features Bridgett M. Davis (Into the Go-Slow), Saeed Jones (Prelude to Bruise), and Lauren Francis-Sharma (‘Til the Well Runs Dry). By coincidence, i randomly picked up two of Nunez’s works at the library a couple of months ago, Beyond the Limbo Silence, and When the Rocks Dance, and they were great introductions to her mythic and magic-filled writing. As I continue to look for Caribbean works that can be analyzed from an afrofuturist lens, I was fortunate to stumble across her work.

Born in Trinidad, Nunez combines Trinidadian and Caribbean culture with magic realist, mytho-spiritual and mystical elements. The first work of hers I read was Beyond the Limbo Silence, an alternate historical fiction set in 1960s Trinidad and America during the Civil Rights Era that infuses water myths, dreams, Voudou ritual and Obeah magic. The story follows Sara Edgehill, a young woman who feels like an outcast in her native land of Trinidad, Continue reading Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth: Elizabeth Nunez ‘s Books of Caribbean Magic

Otherworldly Videos: At the Crossroads – “Cross Road” and “Noka”


Directed by Olivier Gros, Benoit Rimet, Scott Bono and Charles E. Farkas, the film follows a “bluesman blinded by ambition and at the peak of his career is up by the Devil whom he had sold his soul 30years before in exchange for great success.” I guess this film is a possible extension to the Robert Johnson story if he lived to an old age. Also, the main message of the film seems to be if you don’t see the innate value of your creations, someone else will see that value and take it from you.

http://vimeo.com/94712566%20w=680&h=400

Directed by Trinidadian Shaun Escayg, Noka: Keeper of Worlds is a film about an 8-year-old boy named Gabriel with a rare form of schizophrenia which he inherited from his grandfather who recently died. At his grandfather’s funeral, he meets an old friend of his grandfather, who introduces him to “an unseen supernatural realm” for which he and his grandfather are gatekeepers. “Gabriel must abandon all he knows and loves to fulfill his purpose, his legacy, as a NOKA.” I am getting a Matrix, but more fantastical and less technological driven, vibe from this film; I like the Caribbean perspective of it and would like to see it as a feature length film.

Modern Griots Reviews: The Burning Bush by Kenya Wright


https://futuristicallyancient.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/burning.jpg“Motherpounder!” That left me speechless! And by speechless, I am talking about Kenya Wright’s sequel to Fire Baptized, The Burning Bush. In this novel, Wright takes readers deeper into the fantasy world of the Santeria Habitat and main character, Lanore Vesta, expanding on the history and relationships of the beings who live there.

Opening with the bombing of the Linderman’s Blood Factory by her organization MFE (Mixbreeds for Equality) and the shapeshifting Rebels, Lanore’s world becomes chaotic once again as she is dragged back into being an amateur detective solving the murders of two women while trying to enact revenge on the Vampire Dante Botteli, who owns the factory, for killing mixbreeds. Trying to solve the murders, Lanore realizes that who she thought was her enemy and who she thought she could trust may not be so true, and that her problems are much bigger than Dante or even the habitat.

Lanore’s character is the brains in the book; she is observant and logical in her thinking even when others around her may be incompetent, particularly the habbie detective Rivera. The second book in the Habitat series shows Wrights ability in fantasy world-building and characterization; she creates a world that is strange and exciting, yet feels familiar. She is great with the imagery (I can picture it as a film) and providing detailed descriptions of the characters and the cities they are from in the habitat. For example, Wright gives us a look into shapeshifters grieving process and their “seasons” (puberty) and the different types of elemental witches and how they look.

We are also introduced to more characters, like Zulu’s (Lanore’s boyfriend) curious sister, Cassie, the next Palero, Angel, and Lanore’s mentally unstable, druggie demon father, Graham, as well as seeing the connection between main characters deepen. The love triangle between Lanore, Zulu, the MFE leader, and Meshack returns. Meshack constantly flirts with Lanore despite her new relationship with Zulu creating tension, but these scenes often provide needed breaks or moments of levity balancing the tragic moments throughout the book that had me almost in tears.

The only issue with the book is that sometimes the sexual scenes can be a bit too much, specifically at the end. I would have preferred a different memory of one of the characters so that it would not have been so striking of a scene and would have given us a different look into the relationship. But then again, that could have been the connecting essence of their relationship. Other than that, Wright has written another strong story and I can’t wait for the next book. By the way, when you read about Graham, I am kind of picturing Keith David as him in a film, if I haven’t made it obvious that I would like to see this as a film.

The My-Stery: Slaughterhouse Five, Dead Presidents, War and PTSD, Pyschotrauma of Carnage, and The Escapist Fantasy


After reading Kurt Vonnegut’s famous and controversial novel, Slaughterhouse Five, one of the other works that came to mind was Dead Presidents, starring Larenz Tate. Besides both works detailing veterans with PTSD, previously related to shell shock at that time, after witnessing the terror of war, they both tie together the psychotrauma of witnessing that carnage and the fantasty of escapism.

The two pieces have a number of parallels. One of the memorable covers of Slaughterhouse Five is the yellow skull and crossbones on the striking red cover. The cover thematically reflects the Dead President’s movie cover of the painted skull used as a mask in the bank robbery. The climax of the novel, which it is named after, brings Billy Pilgrim, the story’s time-traveler, to a slaughterhouse for animals in Dresden. In Dead Presidents, the main character, Anthony Curtis, after coming home from war, works for some time in a butcher shop and has terrifying nightmares that include it. The imagery of carnage is linked to not only the widespread destruction that they viewed in war, but also the death of their innocence. Both characters are depicted as having changed, a kind of death, after traumatic experiences. Vonnegut repeatedly mentions blue and ivory colors of Pilgrim’s feet to show a kind of death that he has experienced. After the war and the plane crash, Pilgrim becomes more detached from the real world. Neither is Curtis the same. His wife Juanita in the violent argument they have before Curtis leaves for good mentions that he is not the same person he was before the war and she doesn’t know him anymore. Of course, he’s not, the war killed the old him.

Another parallel is the two works’ criticism of American capitalist social structure, social injustice and the mistreatment of veterans, most of whom have mental illness and/or are poor. They both highlight that American society values money more than human life, and soldiers and veterans get the short end of the stick. Pilgrim and Curtis’ disillusionment with the society leads to fantasies of escape, but in two different ways.

Continue reading The My-Stery: Slaughterhouse Five, Dead Presidents, War and PTSD, Pyschotrauma of Carnage, and The Escapist Fantasy