Tag Archives: Questlove

Moving on the Wires: The reImagining Project + Electronium + “Scars/Stars” + “Free the Town” + THEESatisfaction + Ancestral Voices


Sorry everyone for not posting last week, but I was working on an essay for the Afrofuturism 2.0 (and falling in love with The Walking Dead hehe). But below are some things that are happening or will happen in the near future:

*A friend of mine sent me this project from photographer, Ijeoma D. Iheanacho, called the reImagining. Inspired by Audre Lorde’s quote “It is axiomatic that if we do not define ourselves for ourselves, we will be defined by others-for their use and to our detriment,” the purpose of the project is “to give Black women the right to determine for themselves the images they want representing them, and thus establish and distribute their own identities. The photography created for this show will be the opportunity for 100 Black women to reclaim their identities not just from the world, but for themselves.” Iheanacho wants to shed light on the “everyday Black women” who are either ignored or misrepresented. The 300 photographs will be part of an exhibition, gallery tours and outreach programs for organizations. After reading the article about ending stereotypes of Black women, this project is definitely feels necessary.I volunteered to be part of the project, so I will be working on that in the future. Iheanacho is still looking for models, so if you want to join or donate, contact her here.

Continue reading Moving on the Wires: The reImagining Project + Electronium + “Scars/Stars” + “Free the Town” + THEESatisfaction + Ancestral Voices

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Modern Griots Reviews: “Finding the Funk…


Source: VH1

…and getting the respect!”

Author, music historian and filmmaker, Nelson George, said at a rough cut screening of his latest film, Finding the Funk, that funk music was a music for outsiders. Reaching its peak in the 70s and early 80s, the short time between the eras of soul and post-bop/funky jazz and the rise of hip-hop, funk and its pioneers have left a prominent impression on current music, but do not receive as much historical analysis as other genres of popular music. While other genres, like blues, jazz, soul and even our most current hip-hop, have tons of books and documentaries about them, George himself said he could only find one definitive book about the history of funk, Rickey Vincent’s Funk: The Music, The People, and The Rhythm of The One. Basically in popular culture, funk almost still remains an enigma or a shadow of the future, despite having the likes of James Brown, Sly and the Family Stone, Parliament Funkadelic, Zapp, Cameo, Slave, Mtume, Prince, LaBelle and plenty more in that legacy.

In comes, George, with his documentary to give a chance for audiences now to get to know better the history and faces of funk, if they have not already. Although this was a rough cut — the final version will premiere on VH1 in November with more performance footage and songs — George’s film had a lot of potential mainly because of the interviews with many of those involved in funk, most prominently George Clinton, Bootsy Collins and the elusive, and kind of spaced-out interview-wise, Sly Stone. Opening with a joke from one of funk’s founding father’s, James Brown, about a guy who doesn’t know the directions in Harlem, but yet knows he’s not lost, the film balances the heavy baselines of funk with lighthearted laughter in the interviews.

Continue reading Modern Griots Reviews: “Finding the Funk…

…An Album By Its Cover: The Roots’ Rising Down


<br />Fear of Negro rule was still evident in 1900. Cartoon by Norman E. Jennette published in the Raleigh News And Observer.<br />Rising Down, the eighth studio album of The Roots wasreleased on April 29, 2008. Above is the original drawing used the for the cover “The Vampire that Hovers Over North Carolina,” cartoon by Norman E. Jennette.  Published in the Raleigh News And Observer, 27th September 1898 during the North Carolina Election of 1898, it is apparent that there was still fear of a Negro rule. <br />Questlove from The Roots explains the cover, “it’s about The Reconstruction period in American History. This drawing entitled “Negro Rule,” and it pretty much sums up the feeling of the Confederate Union towards the newly freed slaves and the idea that if given power they would reek havoc and chaos on the country.”<br />Source<br />

Via Lostinurbanism and Karnado

Fear of Negro rule was still evident in 1900.

Rising Down, the eighth studio album of The Roots was released on April 29, 2008. Above is the original drawing used the for the cover, “The Vampire that Hovers Over North Carolina,” a cartoon by Norman E. Jennette, which was published in the Raleigh News And Observer on the 27th of September 1898 during the North Carolina election. It is apparent that there was still fear of a Negro rule.

Questlove from The Roots explains the cover: “it’s about The Reconstruction period in American History. This drawing is entitled “Negro Rule,” and it pretty much sums up the feeling of the Confederate Union towards the newly freed slaves, and the idea that if given power they would reek havoc and chaos on the country.”

Sadly, this kind of thinking is still true today. Black people are thought of as the vampires of the country, sucking it dry (ex. welfare queens), but it is actually the other way around.