Tag Archives: Black Girls Code

Moving on the Wires: News, Posts, New Music


Submit to the Afrofuturist Affair’s 4th Annual Ball and Mont-long Celebration- Black Holographic Memory

Support this blog by donating to my Paypal (send donations to my email svfreebird87@gmail.com) or my become a patron on my Patreon page!

*Check out my two features on Atlanta Blackstar’s Blerds series, “Using Afrofuturism to Power New Modes of Tech,” and The Root’s My Thing Is series, “Maybe My Weird Version of Blackness Isn’t That Weird.

*Newswise’s “Science Fiction Through Lens of Racial Inclusiveness: Prestigious grant will fund exploration of ethnic futurisms at UCR in 2015-16:” “The University of California, Riverside will expand that universe with a yearlong exploration of ethnic futurisms that have been largely overlooked or marginalized until recently, a program of events funded by a prestigious $175,000 Sawyer Seminar grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

“Alternative Futurisms,” which will launch in September 2015, will bring together African American, Latino, Native American, and Asian American scholars, artists and writers to examine the colonial roots and legacies of science fiction and the power of speculative fiction as a tool for social change.”

*Listen to Africa Writes 2014 – Imagining Future Africa: Sci Fi, Innovation & Technology panel discussion featuring ” Ivor W. Hartmann, writer, editor, publisher and visual artist; Tade Thompson, writer, psychiatrist and clinical director for Adult Mental Health at St James Hospital, Portsmouth; and Geoff Ryman, writer and senior lecturer at the Centre for New Writing, University of Manchester. Moderated by Emma Dabiri, PhD researcher at Goldsmiths University and teaching fellow at SOAS.”

*Books Live’s “Bulawayo, Oduor, Huchu, Kahora and Chela Tackle the Tricky Subject of African Writing, and Hail the Rise of Afro-futurism

*Afropunk’s “FEATURE: ‘Juniper Leaves‘ fantasy book features Black kinky-haired queer nerd:“”AFROPUNK contributor Jaz Joyner is self-publishing a fantasy book featuring a Black kinky-haired queer nerd as the main character. She tells us: “After a year of reaching out to agents and publishing firms with the continuous response that the book ‘sounds good but may not be marketable,’ I decided to take matters into my own hands and self publish.”
Click here if you’d like to support the project (Kickstarter campaign).”

*Huffpost’s “Sci-Fi Artist Saya Woolfalk Creates A Hallucinatory Human Mandala From Dancers:” “The artist, whose father is African American and white and whose mother is Japanese, conjures mythical utopias to explore ideas of race, sexuality, difference, hybridization, cooperation and creativity. Her multimedia works summon viewers on a multicolored trip through mythical research, bunk biology and bizarre costumes, exposing cultural rituals as the fantastical occurrences they have been all along.

Her 2012 exhibition “The Empathics” introduced viewers to a bizarre breed of women who, after encountering genetically unusual buried remains, begin experiencing psychedelic visions that transform them into part plant, part animal hybrids.

This uncanny species, dubbed the Empathics, are an extremely porous culture, literally absorbing their cultural influences and physically mutating as a result. When searching for an iconography suitable for her mythical breed, Woolfalk incorporated the mandala, a nest of squares and circles that, to many, represent the cosmos.

For Buddhist practitioners however,” the Asian Art Museum explains, “mandalas are not just images to view, but worlds to enter — after recreating the image in their mind’s eye, meditators imaginatively enter its realm.”

*Black Girls Code received $190,000 from Google for their Initiative, “which will teach 75 black and Latina teens how to build a mobile app in one day.” Awesome!

Continue reading Moving on the Wires: News, Posts, New Music

Advertisements

Moving on the Wires: News, Posts and New Music


Brer Rabbit:The Opera. Poster by LaRonda Davis.

*Atlanta BlackStar has a new series called blerds, which features topics on technology, lifestyle, education and the arts. Rasheedah Phillips of The Afrofuturist Affair (correction) is one of the writers of the series and here is one of the articles, “Afrofuturism: Black Presence in Sci-Fi Worlds of Technology, Magic, Fantasy:“This is where afrofuturism as a genre, lens, community, and practice becomes important, not as a response or reaction to the lack of representation, but as testament to the fact that not only have Black folk (along with other marginalized groups) already made it into the future, we are, in fact responsible for shaping it.” Also stayed tuned to a feature I will have on the series in the future.

*This show will not premiere until January 2015, but the art for it already looks cool! Greg Tate revealed an up coming show from Aisha Cousins and The Burnt Sugar House of Ideas, Brer Rabbit:The Opera at BRIC in Brooklyn. It is as he described a fabulation upon gentrification. Poster by LaRonda Davis.

*Black Girls Code partnered with General Assembly to bring more underrepresented groups into tech with Opportunity Fund scholarships. If you are part of an underrepresented group (women, person of color, veteran), apply here.

Continue reading Moving on the Wires: News, Posts and New Music

Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts


*Please support this blog by donating! Either click on the donate button on the side or at the end of the page on mobile, or send donations to my email svfreebird87@gmail.com via paypal. Thank you!

*On June 17th, I will be premiering music artist Daví’s music video for his single “Clear.” The song is a collaboration between the visionary artist himself, Radio Adidas DJ/Beatmaker, FAKEPAKT (Turkey) and Turkish-born/Brooklyn based trap music producer, Atilla.

*Colored Girls Hustle, featuring Taja Lindley and Jessica Valoris, will be hosting listening parties in Brooklyn (18th), Detroit (22nd) and Washington DC (25th) for the release of their mixtape on June 19th. Below is the description of the mixtape:

ABOUT THE MIXTAPE
After much anticipation the Colored Girls Hustle Hard Mixtape will be released on Thursday June 19th, 2014. This day is also Juneteenth – the anniversary of the enforcement of the Emancipation Proclamation and a commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. In the spirit of celebrating freedom and liberation, the Mixtape will be released and available for free download. The Mixtape features songs and interludes about courage, overcoming fears, personal power, pleasure, student loan debt, surveillance, motherhood, and more. Visit www.ColoredGirlsHustle.com for more info.”

To find out more information, click here. Below is their first single, “Afro Aliens.”

Continue reading Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts

Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts


*Please DONATE to my blog! Any amount is appreciated! You can click the paypal button at the side panel or send it to my email svfreebird87@gmail.com through paypal. I was not able to do this post last week because my computer malfunctioned, so this is a combined post for the past two weeks.

*If you haven’t seen it already, the trailer for Oya: Rise of the Orisha premiered this week!
It looks like the film will be epic! Inspired by the Yoruba religion of West African and its goddess/warrior-spirit of winds, storms, fertility, magic and guardian of the underworld, Oya, the synopsis of the story follows Ade “one of the few people with a connection to one of the gods, Oya. She has been tasked with the job of protecting the innocent and that means keeping the door to the gods shut. If the doorway to the gods is opened, they will wreak chaos upon us as retribution for our abandonment of them. To keep the door shut, she must find ‘the key,’ a young girl with the potential to open the doorway, and keep her safe.

The adventure unfolds with a host of memorable characters and a string of unexpected twists, Ade, goes in search of the key, battling against those who wish to open portal and unleashing a horde of forgotten gods and goddesses into the world, with powers and skills beyond our comprehensive and supernatural gifts which will change the course of history for mankind, forever.”

Take a look at Black Girls Code Episode 2:

Continue reading Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts

Modern Griots Reviews: Black Girls Code


Me and Bryant
Me and Bryant

Where was Black Girls Code when I was younger?! Event today, black women make up less than 3% of the STEM industries and other women of color is lower, less than 1%.

Last Thursday, I attended the showing of the Black Girls Code short documentary and fundraising event. Already having taught over 1500 girls across the country, the organization wants to change those statistics above and hope to reach one million all over the world by 2040, maybe earlier, 2020.

The organization’s founder, Kimberly Bryant, an electrical engineer, created the non-profit after noticing the lack of women, specifically women of color in these fields, and recognizing that her daughter, Kai, was using the technology, but not creating it. Besides that, with computer classes costing thousands of dollars and lack of computer science in grade schools, it is difficult for younger children from lower class backgrounds to obtain that knowledge. Through summer camps, one-day.one-topic class, 6-7 week Saturday classes, mobile labs, and working with other organizations and schools, they want to open the doors of opportunity for them.

Continue reading Modern Griots Reviews: Black Girls Code

Moving on the Wires: Black Girls Code in NYC +Afrikadaa/Afrofuturism +Afrofuturism 2070+Black Girls Are From the Future+Blogging While Brown…


*On Thursday in Brooklyn, Black Girls Code will have a free screening of their documentary with founder Kimberly Bryant. “The event will help support our expanded Summer of CODE 2013 and bring our mobile lab to 10 new cities and reach 2,000 more girls. In addition, we will discuss the development of New York City Chapter of Black Girls CODE.” Click here to rsvp.

*Afrikadaa Magazine recently released their issue 5 on Afrofuturism, which features both French and English articles. Take a look at it here and the other issues, too (“Birth,” “Black Renaissance,” “Visibility,” “Identity”).

*At the San Francisco Main Public Library’s African American Center, the exhibition Afro-Futurism: Envisioning the Year 2070 and Beyond is running till August 1 and features artists Durrell Owens; Ajuan Mance; Karen Oyekanmi; Tomye; Malik Seneferu (whose wife, Karen Senefru recently did the Black Women is God exhibition); James Anderson; Safety First; Michael Ross; Jarrel Phillips; Nyame Brown; James M. Kennedy; Sara Marie Prada. Read about it here.

*The tentative table of contents for the upcoming book Black Girls Are From the Future were released with topic including Steve Harvey, For Colored Girls, hair, technology, twerking, Whitney Houston, Makode Linde and more. B

*I will be at Blogging While Brown on Saturday and will be tweeting from the event under the hashtag #FABWB

Continue reading Moving on the Wires: Black Girls Code in NYC +Afrikadaa/Afrofuturism +Afrofuturism 2070+Black Girls Are From the Future+Blogging While Brown…

Black Girls/Black Women Are from the Future: Q.U.E.E.N., Black Girls Code and MBIB


Janelle Monae’s “Q.U.E.E.N.” featuring Erykah Badu. This song is a much better anthem than, dare I say, “Run the World (Girls).” It is funky and fierce with thoughtful commentary about those who judge and put others down. Check out Monae interview yesterday on 106 and Park.

Black Girls Code Trailer — the short film about the Kimberly Bryant’s San Francisco organization, and directed by Shanice Johnson will be shown at the Cannes Film festival this month. The organization is also developing a web-series and a feature.”

My Black is Beautiful trailer for Imagine A Future documentary, which will be released in July on BET (it showed with the Tribeca Film Festival last month), is part of the Imagine a Future initiative that began last year with Black Girls Rock and United Negro College Fund to open up a dialogue with young black girls about self-acceptance, beauty and empowerment. The film follows Janet Goldsboro trip to South Africa as she learns to accept herself as a beautiful. However, although I think this is a nice effort and I want to see it, I find it problematic that Procter and Gamble supports the film and My Black is Beautiful, but also sells “skin lightening” creams all over the world (read all the articles here). Hmmm? Some people say that these are only skin tone evening creams, but is that how they are marketed or used? I imagine a future where companies actually do make a legitimate effort not to make money off our low self-esteem, not seem to support something to assuage their guilt (but should I expect companies not to be hypocritical in their actions?)