Tag Archives: Museum of the Moving Image

Moving on the Wires: Museum of Moving Image + Brown Girl Begins + More!


Happy Black History Month, or Black Futures Month, depending on who you ask! 2018 is off to a great start for Futuristically Ancient! See the news below:

*The Afrikan Poetry Theatre is hosting Past, Present and Futurism at the Museum of the Moving Image on February 24th from 2pm-6pm. The day includes film screenings, such as the Ethiopian sci-fi film Crumbs, and a panel discussion, “Afro-futurism: The History & Future of Black Science Fiction,” featuring graphic artist Tim Fielder, filmmaker Mike Sargent, filmmaker M. Asli Dukan and yours truly! Also a special award will be presented to Octavia Butler! RSVP here!

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Moving on the Wires: News, Posts, New Music


AiRich

*Afropunk “Feature: Visual Artist AiRich Talks About Her Afrofuturistic and Raw Style:“My name is AiRich. According to the people who surround me, my photography can work safely in the category of “afrofuturism”. This has mainly to do with the style, the spiritual aspects that others link to my work. I see this as a great compliment, because my style was first developed by an optimistic philosophy that whatever is inside of me can come out. I welcome it, as it is an expression and reflection of my lifestyle, taste, who I am and how I see the world. One of the most recognizable landmarks in my work is that I only make use of Black models, whom in the first instance are not the ideal beauty image requirements in western photography. My approach is conceptual and in the opposite direction, of western photography. Often with a specific story [traditional and non-traditional] or message that I want to say the story is often in the expression, the styling or setting. Most times the story alone is a non-theatrical physical positioning of the model. Whatever comes out, it is always and expression of the culture, myth and reality of the Black people’s truth.”

*CCCADI Roots and Stars: Destiny and Purpose – Pathways to Passion event will be tomorrow at 6:30pm at the Dwyer Cultural Center: We beckon our most passionate lives in this cross-traditional conversation exploring the concepts of Destiny and Purpose. Marinieves Alba presents a prayer-talk about the Lukumi concept of Ori, a metaphorical bird of destiny and highest purpose that, perched atop each person’s spiritual head, guides us in our flight through life.  Joshua Bee Alafia, representing the Buddhist tradition, discusses the power of meditation to achieve greater levels of personal clarity, courage, and a bold allegiance to the sincerity of the heart.Roots and Stars is CCCADI’s salon series dedicated to exploring Black spiritual genius as expressed in art, practice, and the ritual of everyday life.

*Also tomorrow: Schomburg Center presents conversation, Before 5: Xenobia Bailey and Tammi Lawson, in which the two will discuss the inspirations to Xenobia’s Reconstruction of Funktional Design: A Design Project for Social, and Economic Urban Redevelopment. The artist will share how the creative wisdom of her family’s history originating crafts skills and a material culture in the aesthetic of funk within small African American and multi cultural communities in Seattle Washington and how the migration to Brooklyn and presently living in Harlem influenced her lifestyle and is the foundation of her education and the principal of her Professional Practice. She will speak of her environment of being raised by self educated parents and extended family members of how they manifested an art form, of humbly living in grace by design, in spite of the set backs of Jim Crow Laws that most hard working African American Families experienced in rural and urban communities.

This will be an afternoon survey of a few examples of the Material Culture of the Visual Aesthetic of Funk: The Dynamic Art of Gracefully Living a Dream in a North American Discriminatory Nightmare. Xenobia will share images of Familiar, but under appreciated references and inspirations from the Designs, Engineering and Inventiveness of the low-income, African American homemakers and domestic workers.”

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Modern Griots Recap: The Outsider in Science Fiction Panel


Source: MSNBC

I am one who likes to believe in synchronicity and having watched a National Geographic documentary a few days ago called, “When Aliens Attack,” this panel at the Museum of the Moving Image happened at the right time. What does our encounters and representations of the outsider or “alien” reveal about our psyches?

On Sunday, the museum curator Warrington Hudlin hosted the panel which featured moderator and founder of the sponsoring Philip K. Dick film festival Dan Abella, author Walter Mosley, director Alex Rivera (Sleep Dealer), writer and producer Lawrence Oliver Cherry, and director Carlos Molinero. Two of the panelists, author Sam Delany and writer and producer Lola Salvador unfortunately were not able to attend. Hudlin opened the discussion by explaining why he decided to put together the panel about African-American and Latinos in science fiction, saying that he wanted to show how these groups have transformed the artistic form despite being locked out from it. The panelists spoke of their own works and people of color’s voices in science fiction and speculative fiction provide a different lens of how to look at the world, in addition to how science fiction’s big ideas reveal deeper thoughts about humanity.

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