Tag Archives: Spirituality

Art of This World: Tarot/Oracle Cards


Last week Sunday, I met with some members of the Black August Cocoon Collective that Ola Ronke of Free Black Women’s Library started for the month of August as a way to bring together a community of black woman to do a series of activities and rituals that will later result in us creating a zine.

Since the Sunday coincided with a new full moon in Leo, Ola had each of us pick a card from Earthlyn Manuel’s Black Angels Card deck. The card I got was the Joker. At first I thought that was strange because I don’t think I’m much of a funny person or a jokester, but I have been studying trickster archetypes and gods like Eshu/Elegba, I do love word play when it comes to my writing practice and as the book explanation says, I seem to have a liveliness that attracts others to me.

Take a look at the card and read the description for it (click on the pictures for full size):

 

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“Space:Queens”: Timeless at The Black Spectrum Theatre


12243144_10153701781658695_4582097461109313103_nLast Friday, I was privileged with a ticket to attend Black Spectrum Theatre’s play Timeless: The Mystery of Dark Water, written by the theater’s founder, Carl Clay. This was my first time seeing a play at the theater in recent memory and if I had to sum up the play with four M’s, it would be Mind Research, Memories, Mystery and Murder!

For those who are not aware of it and its history, The Black Spectrum Theatre was founded in 1970 in Roy Wilkins Park in Jamaica, Queens, and its mission has been to bring African-American cultural expression and the American contemporary theater and film to the local community.

Clay’s Timeless follows a New York insurance employee, Kyle, who is under interrogation by police after his girlfriend, Mya, a psychotherapist, is found murdered. What comes after is a story that explores memory, past lives, reincarnation, and connections between people across time and space.

Inspired by his own life experiences in April 1994 and works like that of psychotherapist Brian L. Weiss, who does hypnosis and past life regression, Clay manages to explore this psycho-spiritual concept without any heavy-handedness and turning audiences off from engaging with it. Using the plot of a romance/murder mystery with a bit of humor, the play was down-to-earth and captivating with enough suspense and clever manipulation of lighting, film screen and sound effects to pull us in as audience into its web.

The character Kyle (played by the charming actor with a commanding presence Reginald L. Barnes) meets “by chance” Mya (played by Claudia Rodriguez, who provides an strong foil for Kyle, especially towards the end in the more emotional scenes) at the bar Josie’s. Through meeting Mya and undergoing her hypnosis/dream therapy sessions, Kyle discovers knowledge about himself beyond the daily life he lives currently. Those in his life from Mya to his best friend Mel to the detectives in the investigation to even the bartenders at the bar are all connected to his life in the present and in his distant pasts.

Over the course of the play, we see Kyle gathering fragments from previous lives, including being a soldier on a war submarine, a farmer who leaves his marriage to find aIMG_0422 new life in the city and other lives further back in time. Mya and him are brought closer as they find out that they have met before in another life and clues and events in their lives have crossed time and space. One in particular is an ex-husband who wants revenge for the cheating wife who leaves him, even if its means getting it in the next life. With a criminal mystery crossing through time, the detective work is much more complex and left us all guessing who the vengeful murderer was until the last moment because with reincarnation that person could be anyone.

The twist and turns of this murder mystery resembles well the twist and turns of the
mystery of life and past lives. The unresolved nature of the story and the unresolved, unending nature of life and the soul allows the story to possibly continue into the future (and I wouldn’t mind a sequel). It gives the play a Borges-like feel to it, much like in his short story collection Labyrinths, which includes stories, like “Death and the Compass;” both have themes of a deeper search for meaning in life, the metaphysical interconnection of all things and spaces through all time, and murder and detective work.

In Timeless, death becomes a revealer of life’s lessons and truth and that in this universe all live and stories are interwoven across time and space in a mystical round, a perpetual motion of creation. Like spiritual detectives, we are forced to lift the veil of separation between us and between the past, present and future to go deeper to new dimensions. It is as Mya says, a future exploration by journeying through the inner space to a higher consciousness.

Go see Timeless, showing for the next two weekends: Friday-Saturday 8pm and Sunday 4pm!

And here’s a treat from the small museum inside the theater – a poster from an earlier Carl Clay play!

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The Return of the Future Ancient — Cue Music


Hello Everyone!

Sorry I have been away for a while; I was working on a big book festival project that was supposed to be scheduled for this year, but due to unforeseen conflict, has to be postponed to next year. So, now I have some time to make a comeback, including an upcoming recap of the Afrofuturism conference I attended last weekend at The New School (that will be posted next week).

So my first post will be some great music that has come out since I was gone, some music to take you to a higher level! But first, here is a small tribute to Ben E. King who wrote one of the greatest love songs about a love that could survive even apocalyptic situation, and also a love that is “supernatural.”

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The My-Stery: Manual for The Move Forward (Based on The Salt Eaters)


Toni Cade Bambara

For the first post of the new year, here is a short manual of lessons I was able to tease out from reading Toni Cade Bamabara’s The Salt Eaters. The Salt Eaters is a novel about a small Southern community of Claybourne who are searching for the healing properties of salt while also preparing for a carnival. The book centers on two characters, Minnie Ransom, the community healer and leader of a group of healers, and Velma Henry, who has suffered a nervous breakdown and near suicide, undergoes a healing session. At its base, The Salt Eaters is sankofic its nature — looking back, moving forward and every other way weaved in between. If you want to read more pieces about Bambara’s work, The Feminist Wire recently did a tribute forum for her.

1) “Are you sure, sweetheart, that you want to be well?” The opening question of the book and warning from the healer Minnie Ransom, reminds us that healing and moving forward takes work; it takes processing through a lot of hurtful trauma. Healing is proactive not reactionary. Not only that, when you are well, you are not done. There is responsibility after that (“a lot of weight when you’re well”) (10).

2) Everything is interconnected. One of the characters said, “the material without the spiritual and psychic does not a dialectic make” (64). All parts of life intersect and shape one another (laws of reciprocity, attraction and repulsion, supply and demand on 133). One of the reasons The Salt Eaters is a difficult read is that it cannot be read like a traditional linear novel. The book works more like a webbed-matrix, interweaving in and out of various stories, people, and signs who are all connected to Velma, the main center. The entire community is an extension of Velma and Velma is an extension of them, as we journey through the “master’s mind.” Velma’s healing will affect the entire community It also interweaves various aspects of life from myth to spiritual ritual to science that underpin the book as they are versions of each other and shape each other. If one area is sick or lacking it impacts the others.

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The My-Stery: Animism, Cybernetics and Adaptability


“Android/Negroid # 1” by Wayne Hodge

Ever since my mother received her smart phone, she has constantly been coming to me with numerous questions about how to use it. She has such a difficult time adapting to how it works no matter how many times I show her. No matter how much she uses the smart phone, I don’t think she fully connects or pays attention to it in order to learn. She cannot learn how to use the smart phone if she does not open herself to learning how to use it. Half the time when I am showing her what to do, I am not exactly sure what I am doing myself; I am figuring it out as I go along based on a set of knowledge I have learned already from smart phones and just playing around with it. I try to work with the phone based on how it might move or based on the signs it gives.

Sometimes, I think she sees technology as a magic device that will just do for her and she doesn’t want to take the energy to work with it, to move with it. Sometimes, I think that she thinks of God in that way, too. God is somewhat detached from herself as much as the technology is and she lets it remain that way. This experience with my mother stirred my thoughts on our interaction with God (or higher spirit) and technology. Maybe we should see God (or higher spirit) much like the character Lauren Olamina does in Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower. If “God Is Change,” I have to learn its fundamentals and adapt with it. I have to interconnect with it as if it is a part of me, as if we are extensions of each other, that I have to attach it to me and bend it to my image to survive and grow as much as it bends and changes my image. As for technology, it should be looked at in a similar fashion. It adapts to you as much as you adapt to it.

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Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts


*Please support this blog by donating! Either click on the donate button on the side or at the end of the page on mobile, or send donations to my email svfreebird87@gmail.com via paypal. Thank you!

*On June 17th, I will be premiering music artist Daví’s music video for his single “Clear.” The song is a collaboration between the visionary artist himself, Radio Adidas DJ/Beatmaker, FAKEPAKT (Turkey) and Turkish-born/Brooklyn based trap music producer, Atilla.

*Colored Girls Hustle, featuring Taja Lindley and Jessica Valoris, will be hosting listening parties in Brooklyn (18th), Detroit (22nd) and Washington DC (25th) for the release of their mixtape on June 19th. Below is the description of the mixtape:

ABOUT THE MIXTAPE
After much anticipation the Colored Girls Hustle Hard Mixtape will be released on Thursday June 19th, 2014. This day is also Juneteenth – the anniversary of the enforcement of the Emancipation Proclamation and a commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. In the spirit of celebrating freedom and liberation, the Mixtape will be released and available for free download. The Mixtape features songs and interludes about courage, overcoming fears, personal power, pleasure, student loan debt, surveillance, motherhood, and more. Visit www.ColoredGirlsHustle.com for more info.”

To find out more information, click here. Below is their first single, “Afro Aliens.”

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Modern Griots Review: The United States of Hoodoo


Darius James and Oliver Hardt’s film The United States of Hoodoo has a deceptive quietness with a hidden power underneath it. But then again, it is just another variation of the film’s themes of the trickster and the crossroads.

Returning home to Connecticut, the film follows James’ coping with his father’s recent death and his collection of masks. Looking at his father’s collection, James decides to go on a journey into the world of voodoo and its relation to American culture. Although James’ father liked masks. he always attributed it to aesthetic interest and not the deeper spiritual history behind those masks. But James wants to start scratching beneath the surface.

Opening with a reference to The Wizard of Oz, he is introduced into this world through Haitian musician Val Jeanty (who he compares to Glenda), whose drumbeats seem to reverberate through the rest of the film. It leads him into a journey circling the United States from New York’s African Burial Ground to Robert Johnson’s grave site, and interviewing several people who are knowledgeable about Afro-diasporic spiritual systems or whose work references them, including the Caribbean Cultural Center’s curator and Lucumi practitioner Shantrelle Lewis, artist Danny Simmons, educator Kanene Holder, professor Sylvester Oliver, New Orleans expert Hassan Sekou Allen, writer Ishmael Reed, artist Nick Cave, vodou practitioner Sallie Ann Glassman, curator Ingrid LaFleur and musician David “Goat” Carson.

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