Tag Archives: Black women artists

M.G. Recap: The Bag Lady Manifesta


Based on Taja Lindley’s solo healing performance ritual that debuted at La Mama’s SQUIRTS in 2015, “This Ain’t A Eulogy” is drawing parallels between discarded materials and the violent treatment of Black people in the United States. People in the African Diaspora have a long history of repurposing, remixing, and transforming oppressive systems into valuable cultural practices. In this post-Ferguson moment, Lindley is calling on this legacy to imagine how we can recycle the energy of protest, rage, and grief into creating a world where, indeed, Black Lives Matter. “This Ain’t A Eulogy” is the origin story of The Bag Lady, and serves as a preamble to Lindley’s one woman show “The Bag Lady Manifesta” which debuted at Dixon Place on September 9th.

Below is my review of The Bag Lady Manifesta:

 

dream where every black person is standing by the ocean

& we say to her

what have you done with our kin you swallowed?

& she says

that was ages ago, you’ve drunk them by now

& we don’t understand

& then one woman, skin dark as all of us

walks to the water’s lip, shouts Emmett, spits

&, surely, a boy begins

crawling his way to the shore

by Danez Smith

from Don’t Call Us Dead: Poems

Last week, I read this poem from Danez Smith and I was reminded of it again when watching Taja Lindley debut her The Bag Lady Manifesta on the night of September 9th at Dixon Place.

One question I left with was: what is our responsibility to remember, especially remembering a past still struggling to speak? Is remembering like being Lot’s wife who had the audacity to look back when the world was ending and in ruins? And like salt can be healing, Lindley’s Bag Lady Manifesta was a ritual performance in search of healing — healing that involved giving reverence to people, pasts and even parts of ourselves that we can so easily throw away. Because as Lindley had put up on one of the walls — “letting go is a lie,” we always carry them with us.

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Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts


Steven Klein’s “Warrior Stance”

*Please DONATE at the side panel!

*Submissions guidelines at top of page.

Speculative Fictions By Women Writers I’m going to Read This Year” on Ladies Finger including works from NK Jeminson, Nnedi Okorafor and Karen Lord.

*”Whitewashing reproductive rights: How black activists get erased” on Salon: “Many in the black community have fought for reproductive justice — but we’re often left out of the story”

*”15 Black Women Visual Artists You Should Know” and “Carrie Mae Weems and Mickalene Thomas Discuss Challenging Boundaries Through Visual Art” on For Harriet.

*Omega Sirius Moon Interview on Slash ‘Em Up.

*”Astroblackness Conference Co Creator, Adilifu Nama Speaks” on iAfrofuturism.

*“Tunde Olaniran on Otherness, Archetypes, and Activism” Interview on AudioFemme and his Flint: A Sci-fi Love Story feature on MLive..

*”Black Kirby Now: Interview with John Jennings

*”Steven Klein’s Surrealist City Aliens” on Okay Africa featuring Sudanese Model Ajak Deng.

*”The Incoherent Backlashes to Black Actors Playing ‘White’ Superheroes” on The Atlantic: “Comics have a history of altering characters’ races and ethnicities, but outcry over Michael B. Jordan’s next role illustrates that, in American racism, only certain differences matter.”

Continue reading Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts

Cosmic Ghost At the Museum: Fore Exhibition


StudioLast weekend, I managed to attend the the Fore exhibition at the Studio Museum of Harlem before it closed. I haven’t gone to the museum in a while, so this was a treat. Fore was the fourth part of a series at the museum (Freestyle, Frequency, Flow), but I like the explanation for the name Fore because, as a writer, I like words, their roots and meanings. I never really thought about the word “fore” until the exhibition, but the word does give a sense of the complexity of time; it can represent something that happened earlier or first (before) but also something that is in front or forward. The two meanings combined imply something ahead of its time but happening at an earlier time; it almost sounds as if time is moving backwards or the future is in the past. Or maybe I’m over-thinking it.

Anyway, the exhibition had some innovative emerging artists who caught my eye and I want to highlight:

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