Tag Archives: Speculative fiction

M.G. Reviews: Rasheedah Phillips’ The Telescoping Effect


telescopingeffecteclipsecoverupdatedversion1-26-17_201_400sqOne of my favorite mottos is to find the magic in the mundane because in doing so you realize how interdependent we all are to each other and to the universe. When we look at the sun and moon, we are so normalized to them that we can easily forget how we are dependent on them for our existence and how much they shape our existence. It has been our ability to use our imagination to see the world beyond the mundane and search for knowledge and meaning as well as our creation of technologies to observe the universe that has allowed us to see that. As I was reading Wendy Hui Kyong Chun’s “Race is/as Technology, or How to Do Things to Race,“she writes that “According to Martin Heidegger in his 1955 ‘The Question Concerning Technology,’ the essence of technology is not technological. Indeed, by examining tools, we miss what is essential about technology, which is its mode of revealing or “enframing.” So how does the creation of technologies to look and observe also reveal ourselves? Who is watching who and who is creating who at the same time?

Warning: some spoilers ahead!

Continue reading M.G. Reviews: Rasheedah Phillips’ The Telescoping Effect

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M.G. Reviews: Kiini Ibura Salaam’s “When the World Wounds”– Breaking Open the Boundaries of Self


 

9780991336159-frontcoverWho we think we are is a fluid concept. We might have a stable image of ourselves but in reality we are constantly in flux as we come into contact and collide with others. And it’s not just other bodies but other possibilities of your self that disrupts who you are at this moment. The realization that we can be something else we don’t recognize or can’t control can be transcendent and can be frightening.

Kiini Ibura Salaam explores those ideas in her latest speculative short story collection, When the World Wounds, where the outside forces of the world can break open spaces that lead to the displacement and reconstructing of the body, of the self, of identity and place. Salaam’s main grounding tool in that exploration is that of the concept of desire. Through her sensual and erotic descriptive language, as a reader you are opened up as much as the characters in her stories to the point of an ecstatic experience.

Continue reading M.G. Reviews: Kiini Ibura Salaam’s “When the World Wounds”– Breaking Open the Boundaries of Self

The My-Stery: The “Label” of (Afro)futurism


I have not done this post in a while, so here it goes:

Recently, Shadow and Act reposted an essay from last year, “African Renaissance, How The Prefix ‘Afro-‘ May Arrest Imagination & Manifesto Salesmanship,” by Phetogo Tshepo Mahasha. I had a few thoughts about it that I formed during a private conversation with Cosmic Yoruba last year, but I never published them. So, I decided to do it now, especially after seeing Pumzi director Wanuri Kahiu’s TED Talk about labels:

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Blogging While Brown Changemakers: “God Is Change” – The Meaning Behind Futuristically Ancient


The quotation above is from Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower. Here is a portion of the chant of the religion Earthseed in the novel:

Why is the universe?
To shape God.
Why is God?
To shape the universe.

***

God is Change.
God is Infinite,
Irresistible,
Inexorable,
Indifferent.
God is Trickster,
Teacher,
Chaos,
Clay—
God is Change.
Beware:
God exists to shape
And to be shaped.

God is an ancient and universal concept for humans, but depicting God as change, Butler gave a futuristic, innovative face to God. God is old, but has the ability to mutate and adapt depending on the given circumstance, time and space. Recently, I sat down to think about the meaning of my blog name for myself. I had taken the name based on a blurb for a poet whose work I appreciate, Aja Monet. But as I thought about it I came up with this while working on a new collaboration, and it connects well with Butler’s words and her works in general:

“Time is a kind of network system where the past, present and future are in constant dialogue and interaction: our past gives foundation from which we build our present and future, our present gives foundation for our future, the present reconstructs the past, and the future reconstructs the present and the past. I am somebody’s past as well as somebody’s future and there is a responsibility in the recognition of that. I think traditional African cultures (or ancient Eastern cultures in general) honored that concept, but it was somewhat lost or repressed in mainstream European-based Western culture to forego accountability and to favor a linear and individualistic thought pattern.

Continue reading Blogging While Brown Changemakers: “God Is Change” – The Meaning Behind Futuristically Ancient

Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts


Steven Klein’s “Warrior Stance”

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Speculative Fictions By Women Writers I’m going to Read This Year” on Ladies Finger including works from NK Jeminson, Nnedi Okorafor and Karen Lord.

*”Whitewashing reproductive rights: How black activists get erased” on Salon: “Many in the black community have fought for reproductive justice — but we’re often left out of the story”

*”15 Black Women Visual Artists You Should Know” and “Carrie Mae Weems and Mickalene Thomas Discuss Challenging Boundaries Through Visual Art” on For Harriet.

*Omega Sirius Moon Interview on Slash ‘Em Up.

*”Astroblackness Conference Co Creator, Adilifu Nama Speaks” on iAfrofuturism.

*“Tunde Olaniran on Otherness, Archetypes, and Activism” Interview on AudioFemme and his Flint: A Sci-fi Love Story feature on MLive..

*”Black Kirby Now: Interview with John Jennings

*”Steven Klein’s Surrealist City Aliens” on Okay Africa featuring Sudanese Model Ajak Deng.

*”The Incoherent Backlashes to Black Actors Playing ‘White’ Superheroes” on The Atlantic: “Comics have a history of altering characters’ races and ethnicities, but outcry over Michael B. Jordan’s next role illustrates that, in American racism, only certain differences matter.”

Continue reading Moving on the Wires: This Week’s News and Posts

The My-Stery: Domestic Violence and Speculative Fiction


https://i0.wp.com/arresteddevelopmentmusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/marissa-alexander-4x3.jpgThis is both Domestic Violence Awareness Month and Black Speculative Fiction Month, so, I want to highlight a campaign and a works of speculative fiction that brings awareness to domestic violence. The campaign I want to focus on is 31 for Marissa in honor of Marissa Alexander who fired a warning shot from a gun to protect herself from her abusive husband and faced 20 years in prison for it, following the rejection of the “stand your ground” defense. In September, she received a chance to get a new trial, but still without the “stand your ground” defense. Esther Armah from Emotional Justice writes about 31 for Marissa:

“Emotional Justice Unplugged, Chicago Taskforce on Violence Against Girls and Women, Free Marissa Now launch a month long multi-media letter writing campaign called #31forMARISSA. Throughout the month, we are urging men to write letters of support to Marissa Alexander, share stories of violence experienced by women in their own circles, donate funds for her trial fees and become engaged as active allies in the domestic Cover for 'Flee: A Short Story'violence movement. Participants are also encouraged to invite, inspire, challenge and engage 5 other men to join the campaign. We are asking a nation of men—of all creeds and colors—to stand up and engage in the pursuit of freedom of a Black woman.”

One of the tumblr websites, theSWAGspot, as well as other voices have been participating in the campaign, writing heartfelt letters, poems, anecdotes and articles.

Authors have featured domestic violence and abuse in their works, like Nalo Hopkinson’s Midnight Robber, and Octavia Butler’s Xenogenesis/Lillith’s Brood and Patternist series. Last year, speculative fiction author, Alicia McCalla, published her short story, Flee, which tackles domestic abuse through a fantasy lens. It is suppose to be a prequel to her upcoming Soul Eaters book. You can read it for free, here and here.

Otherworldly Videos: S.A. Miller’s “Into the Darkness”


Happy Friday the 13th!

While browsing the internet for Caribbean speculative film, I found Bajan (Barbadian) filmmaker channel and his apocalyptic film Into the Darkness. The film follows a young boy who is trying to survive amidst the threat of revenants — visible ghosts or animated corpses that were believed to return from the grave to terrorize the living.